a very female community

data pulse #43

Now I’m not one into female fashion ( just ask my wife) , nor do I hang around the shops but I do love how Tamara Hill-Norton has used data to create a passionate community with Sweaty Betty since she set up the first boutique in Notting Hill in 1998 . Initially targeting “yummy Mummies” but now broadened out to connect fitness and fashion.

sweaty betty founder.jpg

Sweaty Betty is a British retailer specialising in active wear for women, featuring in 30 UK stores and 2 new ones in New York and selling significantly digitally. Sweaty Betty aims to ‘inspire women to find empowerment through fitness’.

sweaty betty 2

Sweaty Betty distinguish themselves from the competition by moving beyond traditional retail practices to focus on building an active community. This is achieved through regular Sweaty Betty fitness classes that are actively promoted to its customers. These classes range from yoga, run clubs and boot camps right through to Pilates, and are held in Sweaty Betty stores around the world. For those who can’t attend in person, there are also online fitness classes.

sweaty betty 1

Sweaty Betty was very clear on their purpose and had a very clear story that was developed starting inside the organisation, and building out into their community. A data driven approach to brand building and creating community, loyalty and interaction meant people starting telling the Sweaty Betty story themselves.

Sweaty Betty leverages a broad range of data-driven social tools – Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest are all used. They also created ‘brand ambassadors’ and allowed customers to have a conversation, helping to underline the sense that Sweaty Betty is a ‘fitness community rather than just a sportswear retailer

 

Don’t be frightened of data

data pulse # 33

We should not be frightened to use data: People have been recording data and creating information for thousands of years.

Data use is older than the written word and has been used through history to provide information:

75,000BC the Blombos Ocher Plaque is thought to be the first recorded piece of data.

Blombos Ocher

In 850AD Al-Kindi examined the frequency of letters in text to systematically create and crack coded messages.

Al-Kindi

In 1662 John Gaunt analysed mortality figure (in an early excel spreadsheet) as a means to predict the onset and spread of bubonic plague.

John Graunt excel

In 1855 Florence Nightingale used advanced visualisation techniques to make her data more persuasive for the generals and convince them that more soldiers were dying in the hospitals of the Crimea than on the battlefield, and so allow her to use her lamp.

Florence Nightingale

In the 21st Century there is more data and even more being created every day but the same simple principles apply.

Be clear on your outcome and then decide what data you need to tell the story you want to tell.

Anyone can use data, not just the analysts and data scientists. You just need to give them the confidence , skills and tools to do so.