Loose Lips cost Lives

strava military

I use Strava to map my runs & cycle rides but a recent article caught my attention on the importance of keeping your data private vs public.

Last November, Strava released a global user-activity heat map showing the running and cycling routes of people wearing fitness trackers. Some of those people work for the military & intelligence agencies.

Their data, which they neglected to opt out of sharing, reveals their daily routines and the contours of previously secret bases for anyone with a Strava account who might be looking. “A modern equivalent of the World War II-era warning that ‘loose lips sink ships,’ writes Jeremy Hsu, “May be ‘FFS don’t share your Fitbit data on duty.’”

So far, the breach hasn’t hurt anyone, and militaries and intelligence services will update their facilities (and personnel training policies) to render this particular vulnerability moot. But the unexpected risks of modern geolocation technology remain. “These digital footprints that echo the real-life steps underscore a greater challenge to governments and ordinary citizens alike,” Hsu writes. “Each person’s connection to online services and personal devices makes it increasingly difficult to keep secrets.”

Read the full article here

https://www.wired.com/story/strava-heat-map-military-bases-fitness-trackers-privacy/

7 steps to data-driven customer obsession

seven steps

As we break for Christmas I have just had a great morning with DataIQ Leaders discussing how data can transform CX.

I led a discussion with a group of Analytical leaders with seven simple steps on the road to build advanced Customer Analytics. It’s challenging and requires commitment and alignment from around all the organisation to be successful

  1. Identify the commercial & customer Goals in next 18m-36m
  2. Build a clear vision of a radically different data-driven customer experience, working across digital & bricks & mortar and align across the organisation.
  3. Remove Silos of data use creating a single version of the truth, with a data strategy linked to business goals e.g. Unified View of customer data, GDPR ready and tools developed to meet commercial goals.
  4. Breakdown the institutional fear of data & digital at all levels through training & doing: it’s a tool that anyone can use to do what you have been doing better
  5. Use Data Analytics to Map & Prioritise customer journeys & personalised experiences across human & digital touchpoints and align organisation capability to deliver for customer.
  6. Identify & Build the capabilities (Process, Tools People) that will be required to transform process design from efficiency focused (cheaper) to customer focused (better simpler cheaper) , specifically putting in place an analytics capability to enable data-driven, personalised journeys
  7. Foster stronger bonds between technical and different business people. This is a two-way process to ensure the technical teams understand the commercial imperatives, and customer solutions you would like to build, and the business teams learn to trust the expertise of technical IT teams. It will also allow you to improve data quality through showing the business impact.

Using Data & Advanced Customer Analytics  to put the customer at the heart of an organisation is a transformation that future looking organisations need to start implementing now.

Tech City Coffee

starbucks shop

Understanding customers better has always been critical. Identifying the heart of the commercial challenge and developing customer led solutions to solve them is critical.

Meeting customers needs and simplifying the customer experience using data and digital is a key skill of the new Chief Marketing Officer and delivering the most relevant, inspirational messaging and experiences through advanced segmentation and targeting is a skill every CMO must ensure is delivered.

Starbucks do that

Starbucks carries only 200SKUs but has managed to meet the needs of customers with relevant offers and communications whoever or wherever you are. 

How?

Starbucks Influencing Wheel

Starbucks created a segmentation for customers by day of week, time of day and purchasing details, creating the Starbuck’s Influencing Wheel: which helps frame the problem in terms of what they know about a customer.  Transaction data allows Starbucks to know what behaviours can be observed at purchase time. External f

  1. ENTERPRISE Influences / Transaction data allow Starbucks to know what behaviours can be observed at purchase time ( Food, Beverage, in-store experience etc.)
  2. EXTERNAL Influences ( Weather, Competitors, Events, Community) may impact the way customers behave so Starbucks collected data to simulate local conditions that may affect purchase behaviour.
  3. CUSTOMER Characteristics ( occupation, demographic, need state, day part, media channel preferences etc.)  Not all behaviours can be observed in a transaction so Starbucks deploy .a social listening strategy in order to capture some aspects of a customers lifestyle and how products& services may fit into that lifestyle

starbucks influencing wheel

Customer needs for coffee on way into work, is different to lunchtime or afternoon during the week, and again different to weekend morning coffee. This data is combined with open data to give highly tailored and timely communications with live triggers- offers in the right place at the right time. Arriving at Manchester Piccadilly rail station for early (5-55am)  train to London I get an alert on my phone to pick up a Starbucks coffee for the train. and it really does taste sweet that early in the morning…..

Starbucks also improved the customer experience by being one of the first retailers using a digital app that allows payment through Apple pay or creating a Starbucks wallet that is automatically topped up.

Starbucks are leading the way in delivering the power of value based customer delivery, leveraging data driven analytics and digital technology to drive L4L growth.

Creating C.I. from B.I. for Customers

 

British Gas

Data-Pulse #69

Using data- driven analytics and technology to create new services that improve the Customer Experience by creating CI (customer version of BI) has emerged recently:

British Gas and Southern California Electric:

The development of SMART meters has revolutionised the available data from Energy. British Gas connect multiple sources of data to display personal energy use in simple terms: not just kW usage per day/ hour but cost per day/hour, with comparisons to average houses in the area, all presented in easy to use tables and graphs.

British Gas Hive 2

It provides clear practical information that delivers “Informed Energy”. It tells me last week it cost £3 a day to heat my home, and if i turned the thermostat down by 2 degrees i would save £1 a day……. giving me control

California Electric have used variable and peak demand pricing in California to manage energy use in area where there are energy restrictions.

The creation of Hive by British Gas allows remote control of customers’ home central heating, again with an excellent customer experience, allows customers to run their home more efficiently. I can turn the heating on as I come home from work, or manage remotely my teenage daughter who has turned up the temperature before going out herself.

British Gas Hive

Hive will continue to develop as IoT connects more devices to create a House management system.  your Fridge will be connected via IoT to electricity supply and it will automatically switch itself off in periods of low use ( night time ) when no energy is needed to maintain temperature.

Hive have just launched new products in the Hive product family:

  1. Hive Active Plug to connect home electrical appliances via your phone. eg iron or hair straighteners or schedule lamps to turn on and off when on holiday
  2. Hive window or Door Sensor: you can find out if a door is opened or closed when you are away from the house , they’ll tell you by sending an alert to your phone.
  3. Hive Motions Sensor: extra peace of mind with small and sophisticated sensors sending alerts to your phone if movement spotted in your house. 

british gas hive 1

 

Quick in, quick out. I like

Vikden groceries

#data pulse # 41

Easy in and easy out are key elements of convenience retailing, and Robert Ilijason a 39 year old IT expert has used digital and data to create the first unstaffed convenience retailer in a remote part of Sweden.

It was a chaotic, late-night scramble to buy baby food with a screaming toddler in the back seat that gave Robert Ilijason the idea to open Sweden’s first unstaffed convenience store.

Home alone with his hungry son, Ilijason had dropped the last baby food jar on the floor, and had to drive 20 minutes from the small town of Viken in southern Sweden to find a supermarket that was open.

Now the 39-year-old IT specialist runs a 24-hour shop with no cashier.

 Customers simply use their mobiles to unlock the door with a swipe of the finger and scan their purchases. All they need to do is to register for the service and download an app. They get charged for their purchases in a monthly invoice.

The shop has basics like milk, bread, sugar, canned food, nappies and other products that you expect to find in a small convenience store. It doesn’t have tobacco or medical drugs because of the risk of theft. Alcohol cannot be sold in convenience stores in Sweden.

“My ambition is to spread this idea to other villages and small towns,” said Ilijason. “It is incredible that no one has thought of his before.”

He hopes the savings of having no staff will help bring back small stores to the countryside, so you can have more distribution with longer opening hours in remote areas.

Ilijason receives deliveries at the shop and stacks products on the shelves. Then he lets the customers do the rest.

He has installed six surveillance cameras to discourage shoplifting in the 480-square-foot store. Also, he is alerted by a text message if the front door stays open for longer than eight seconds or if someone tries to break it open.

“I live nearby and can always run down here with a crowbar,” Ilijason said laughing, but added that hasn’t been necessary since the store opened in January.

A bigger challenge has been getting some of the elderly residents in Viken, a town of 4,200 people, to get the hang of the technology involved.

Tuve Nilsson, 75, said there were many more shops in the town when he moved here with his family in 1976. He welcomed Ilijason’s new store, saying it could be convenient for elderly people living alone.

“But if they can manage this (technology), I don’t know,” Nilsson said. “Sometimes I don’t understand it.”

Ilijason is considering other ways to unlock the door that wouldn’t require using an app. He’s ruled out face-recognition or fingerprint scanners, but is thinking of installing a credit card reader like some banks use. He’s also considering having one person man the store for a few hours a day to help customers who aren’t comfortable with modern technology.

Other customers loved the speed of the no-service store. Raymond Arvidsson, a friend of Ilijason’s, did his shopping in less than a minute.

“No queues,” he said, smiling. “Quick in, quick out. I like.”

Vicken sweden

 

Data driven vision for Social Security in Bolanzo

 

data pulse #32

SMART sensors keep Italian seniors living at home

There have been significant step changes in Healthcare in the last few years through their use of predictive and algorithmic data , data segmentation and technology to solve organisational problems

Limited budgets and resources posed a challenge for the city of Bolanzo, with elderly citizens representing almost a quarter of the population and nearly 50% of social budget. With ongoing medical advances, greater numbers of the elderly are living longer and staying in their homes, often alone. The city wanted to ensure their safety and provide the required services, but needed a cost-effective way to know when people needed help.

bolzano 2

The city has implemented an advanced mesh-network of sensors that monitor the home environment – temperature, CO2, water leaks etc – of elderly citizens living alone. Remote interaction with medical professionals via touchscreen and mobile devices provides healthcare advice, saving trips to the doctor.

The technology will also alert ‘angels’ – friends or relatives of the user – if there is a problem, so they can provide assistance until the appropriate services arrive.

This enables social service and health staff to concentrate on people who really need a physical presence with them, while maintaining excellent quality of life for those in the monitoring programme.

If you’d like to checkout a short film that talks it through, here’s the link through to youtube

Data driven Aussies

ARFU fans.jpg

Players always say that when it counts the most, fans and supporters can represent the force of an extra player in the team. the “Unfair Advantage”

Competing against three other football codes in one of the most crowded sporting markets in the world, the Australian Rugby Union (ARU) has used data to harness that Unfair Advantage.

Data has become a crucial battleground at Rugby’s top level with every aspect of a match and a player’s performance analysed over and over to find that competitive edge. The Australian Rugby Union also use data to create a community at grass roots playing and grass roots supporters. They learnt from the 2012 Olympics in London and went back home and built a bottom up connected supporter community.  

As Bill Pulver, ARU CEO, states:   “The fundamentals of running a sport are pretty similar to running a business, the difference being you have this thick layer of passion over the top. “

Unlocking Fan Force with Rugby Link

Rugby Link is the platform through which the ARU engages every member of its community – “from the age of 5 right through to the age of 75”.

According to Bill, the Australian Rugby Union have a digital platform for omnichannel one-on-one communication on  that is relevant to a fan or player’s historical engagement with the game; as well as enabling a customised future with the game as well.  

A good example that Jade McAuslan, CRM Manager, describes is how the platform allows the ARU to understand when fans and players renew their seasonal membership, and as a result, time and personalise their outreach accordingly. The way that the data and metrics inform that personalised connection is critical to keeping people more engaged than with any of the other codes.

In the modern, professional era of Rugby Union, teamwork and communication are fundamental to success on the field. But also increasingly it is the cohesion and strength  of the entire organisation behind that team, all the way down to the 5 year old touch rugby player, that provides that edge to keep the national teams winning again and again. With Rugby Link,  the ARU has secured an Unfair Advantage in that international contest.

It can help them get to the final… but didn’t stop them against the mighty All Blacks

how to connect customers lives?

#data pulse 17

Times have changed significantly since we built the first unified view of customers in Tesco in 2005 working with Clive Humby and the team at dunnhumby. We were cutting edge at the time and had to build all the systems and processes from scratch. Technology has improved with the likes of IBM Infosphere providing MDM systems , and new agile , start-up mentality ways of working changing delivery timetables.

Gone are the days of 12-24 month development programmes, with waterfall methodology and timescales that mean the business imperatives have moved on before they can be addressed.

Hello to technology and ways of thinking about data problems for the 21st Century where leaders can focus on the business problems and organisational process changes required to solve the problems for customers.

met life 2

The MetLife Wall is a good example in financial services of creating a unified view. It joins all linked customer information in a single place, with one screen that gives all of the information needed to serve customers quickly and effectively. The Wall provides a simple 360 view of each customer across MetLife’s businesses. The interface shows interactions across all touch points (e.g. call centre, in-person interactions with agents, claims, policy updates), connecting more than 70 legacy systems. The application allows customer service agents to reach the information they need with far fewer clicks, and makes it much easier to effectively cross-sell.

The first prototype of the system took just 2 weeks to build. The entire development process, from conception to final product, took just 3 months.

The lessons to learn from Met Life are

  1. a clear focus on what problem you want to solve with the Unified View of Customers.
  2. an agile, start-up mentality where you build minimum credible product and then continually improve.
  3. unified view of customers is a start point to solve business problems not an end point,